15 Comments

I love this advice, Cory, especially as it applies to defeating negative behaviors. I've always thought of the 5 minute rule for taking one small step toward a positive behavior, but there's something so positive about using it for replacing a negative one.

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Thank you Heather.

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Ya, I never thought of using the 5-minute rule like that but, looking back, whenever I'd pause before simply acting on an impulse, I'd often find that, a few moments later, the urge would subside and the pawing desire would leave me be. I think it takes a certain desire towards self-control to notice the impulse and to not act on it (and I assume most people reading this newsletter are of that mind!).

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Mar 21Liked by Cory Allen

Can I ask a genuine question? I struggle with the opposite problem where all I want to do is pursue productive measures and then feel guilt when doing something like watch tv, play a video game, or read fiction.

It’s terrible. And it all stems from the finitude of time and making the most of it.

Any thoughts?

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Balance is key. Try looking at rest as a form of productivity if you need to. Something I posted elsewhere:

Rest is growth. Taking time to recharge is essential because when we spend energy we aren’t growing; we’re pushing boundaries and increasing our capacity for growth. Rest is when we stop pushing and grow into the new space we’ve created.

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Mar 21Liked by Cory Allen

Love this. Thank you so much.

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One thing I think about is how much time is enough for us to be on task. So often people say they don't have time to even get enough sleep. Why has our culture gotten to a place where we need to be 'doing' more than 16 hours a day?

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Good point. How effective can we really be if we never stop and recharge our batteries? I don't think humans are built to work consistently all day long. There will be a drop-off of output and quality, undoubtedly.

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Beautifully written. Not much can be accomplished until we take care of ourselves.

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dear cory,

i have thought about what you've written here for more than 5 minutes, and i have come to the conclusion that i appreciate it and you very much!

love,

myq

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Haha thank you friend!

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Mar 25Liked by Cory Allen

My restack says it all. Corey, this is a beautiful essay on procrastination, and could not have been better timed for me to receive the knowledge. Thank you!

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Mar 22Liked by Cory Allen

This is so true and I experience it almost every day since I work from home and am a solo practitioner attorney. So if I don’t have discipline or control over my impulses I can easily get lost in my endlessly growing to do lists and not do my tasks but when I’m on top of it and execute the small tasks day after day they add up to big things. Therefore, consistency and resilience are paying huge dividends for me and created a reputation and trust with my clients for over 25 years which in turn grows my practice and helps me build a life that I love and is curated just for me!

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Yes, when you have nobody managing you or looking over your shoulder, it's all on you to show up, do first things first, and stay consistent. All the more reason to learn how to manage impulse control!

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Helpful article, Cory. Thanks. It brings to mind some recent knowledge I picked up from Ali Abdaal and it's the idea of, if we repeated the things we did every week/month for the next 10 years, where would that take us?

Thinking in this way zooms out from the perspective of a single day and can give form to the "bigger picture" for how we envision our lives. It seems to make the smaller decisions more significant as they are viewed through a much wider lens.

I just thought I'd share that as I know when I heard it, it caused a bit of an "a-ha" moment.

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